Friday, August 22, 2014
Text Size

Improved relations between police, FSIN

By Terrence Mceachern, The Leader-Post

Months after a public forum between police and First Nations leaders in Regina to discuss violence in the community, both sides are feeling optimistic about improved relations and changes that have taken place. "There have been linkages made that weren't there before," said Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (FSIN) Vice-Chief Kimberly Jonathan. "There has been a clear communication gap that's been resolved."

On Nov. 6, Jonathan and Regina Police Chief Troy Hagen were part of a public forum at Regina Treaty Status Indian Services Inc. to discuss three recent homicides as well as violence against aboriginal women.

Weeks later, Hagen participated in a public march in downtown Regina with First Nations leaders to raise awareness about the issues.

"The people needed to see that his heart is obviously with this file," said Jonathan.

"The important part is (Hagen) is not coming in and saying 'I know everything and I know what's best for you families (and) First Nations communities.' He has his ears open (and) he has the best interests at heart."

Jonathan saw the positive results of improved relations when she received a phone call on Dec. 31 from police informing her that an arrest had been made in the Sept. 25 homicide of Kelly Goforth. The call helped Jonathan prepare support and have resources in place to help Goforth's family.

Jonathan also noted improved relations with the Prince Albert Police Service and the Saskatchewan RC MP.

"They're so enthusiastic. They want to listen, they want to learn (and) they want to help. They want to ensure we create safe communities in "F" Division through Saskatchewan," she said.

Jonathan said that educating young women about how to stay safe needs to continue.

"Staying together when they are going to be out and about, whether it's to a bar or to the park, wherever - that they keep together and that they watch their beverages (and) that they make smart decisions to be able to keep themselves safe," said Jonathan.

"And if they are going to be gone away, that they ensure there is communication to family members and friends."

Despite the improved relations with police, Jonathan is still calling for a national public inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women to give families a voice and find answers. She said it is upsetting to hear arguments relating all missing aboriginal women to prostitution or abuse of drugs or alcohol.

On Friday, Bob Morin, deputy police chief, noted that there are too many longterm missing persons cases in Canada and, although he doesn't oppose a public inquiry, the decision to invoke one is not in his control.

He added that cases involving unsolved missing and murdered aboriginal women can be a source of frustration for investigators and families.

"I mean, people disappear off the face of the earth. And we continue to look at those investigations but I think more importantly it's frustrating for the families and loved ones of those folks who are really left to wonder where their loved ones are," said Morin.

Since 2005, there have been three missing and two unsolved murdered aboriginal women cases in Regina. "We have put a lot of time and effort in those files and we continue to investigate them, and it's frustrating when we continue to see long-term missing people knowing the impact it may have on those families."

Whatever Trevor

Dis is Trevor.

Blast from the past: FP archive

When is Consultation, Consultation?

Ovide Mercredi

National Chief – AFN

During a Treaty Roundtable meeting of the Alberta Chiefs, I took note of a federal government document outlining their strategy to define and ultimately impose their own form of self-government. Read more...

Letting go of residential schools

by Gilbert Oskaboose, Nov 1993 First Perspective

There is a lot of "unfinished business" in Indian Country. Garbage that we as a people have never really dealt with. Chief among them is the whole issue of those infamous residential schools and their impact on people. Read more...

OBIDIAH

obidiah picture

ANALYSIS - Bill Gallagher

gallagher picture

Under the Northern Sky by Xavier Kataquapit

Under the Northern Sky by Xavier Kataquapit

JOBS

First Nations Cultural Interpreter PM – 02 Riding Mountain National Park Seasonal Indeterminate

(May to October) From $54,543 to $58,764

Closing Sept. 19, 2014

Read More

ASSISTANT DEPUTY ATTORNEY GENERAL, ABORIGINAL JUSTICE DIVISION (AMENDED)

Organization: Ministry of the Attorney General, Aboriginal Justice

Toronto, Deadline: Aug. 25, 2014 11:50 pm EDT Read more...

Regional Media Officer– Temp (Until Nov 2015) –F/T Position

Office of the Leader of the Official Opposition / NDP Research Office

Location:131 Queen Street, Suite 10-02, Ottawa, ON

Responsibilities

Communicate regularly with regional media outlets (community newspapers, radio stations, student media, ethnic media, etc.) to propose ideas for interviews and opinion content Read more...

Canadian Chamber of Commerce Aboriginal Workforce Report

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce released a report that highlights initiatives to improve the workforce participation of Aboriginal peoples. 

Opportunity Found: Improving the Participation of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada’s Workforce (December 2013)  

click image to download report

Wed Jul 23 @ 9:00AM - 05:00PM
Asinabka Film Media Arts Festival
Sun Jul 27 @12:00AM
World Indigenous Business Forum 2014

EVENTS

August 2014
S M T W T F S
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 1 2 3 4 5 6
imageimageimageimageimage
cartoonscartoonscartoonscartoonscartoons

Current Video

RIP Percy Tuesday

 

Thanks to Althea Guiboche for allowing The First Perspective to share her video taken at the Manitowapow book launch at McNally Robinson. 

Percey sings Freddy Fender's "Wasted Days and Wasted Nights" and people join in to harmonize. 

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO): The Washington Redskins